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Diodati points to Bradley’s emergency declaration as eclipse tourism falls short of expectations

The number of visitors to Niagara Falls for the eclipse was less than expected, and Niagara Falls Mayor Jim Diodati is blaming Niagara Region Chair Jim Bradley’s emergency declaration for scaring many tourists away.

“It scared people,” Diodati said about Bradley’s March 29 decision to declare a state of emergency in the leadup to the solar eclipse. “People immediately started cancelling rooms and started cancelling reservations.”

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Niagara sees ‘alarming growth’ in number of residents using food banks

In a trend that “does not show any signs of slowing down,” Niagara’s food banks are being stretched thin.

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Final days of NHL and NBA regular seasons

As the regular seasons wind down for both the National Hockey League and National Basketball Association…

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story National

O Canada, we (do not!) stand on guard for thee

One of the most important duties of any federal government is to provide adequate national defence for the protection of its citizens.

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Construction of new school completed in Beamsville

The community of Beamsville received $50.4 million from the provincial government to build the new West Niagara Secondary School.

story Opinion

Upbeat conservatives in Ottawa

Over the last few days, this writer has spent the last few days at the Canada Strong and Free Network’s (CSFN) annual conference.

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story National

Public inquiry paves way for action on foreign interference in advance of next election

After more than a year of speculation and unnamed sources and media reports blowing the whistle on the size…

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2024 solar eclipse delivers once-in-a-lifetime experience for Niagara Falls viewers

Local

Monday, April 8, 2024, provided much of North America with an astronomical spectacle that will not recur in this century. The total solar eclipse, which has been anticipated by celestial enthusiasts for years, attracted approximately one million people to the city of Niagara Falls alone.

Dave Kirsh is an Astronomical Lecturer at Toronto Metropolitan University and was on tap for the eclipse in Niagara Falls. Kirsh, who viewed a partial solar eclipse on May 10, 1994, says that since it has been one hundred years since the last total solar eclipse was visible in this region, it was, until yesterday, very unlikely that any of us would know someone who has seen one.

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Niagara Region residential market continues to move in the right direction: Niagara Association of Realtors

Local

The Niagara Association of Realtors (NAR) released its March market update on the local housing market, noting that more homes…

story

Cal Clutterbuck named Welland Sportsperson of the Year

Sports

He received the call about a month ago from his father to tell him he was being named the Welland Sportsperson of the Year.

story

Eclipsing common sense

Opinion

Many centuries ago, people were afraid of solar eclipses because they didn’t understand their origins and feared that the sun was gone forever.

story

Ford’s gravy train chugs along

Provincial

It’s like a bad joke. How many politicians does it take to screw in a light blub?

story

Trudeau’s bold budget strategy: A game-changer for Canadians?

National

With the federal budget set for next Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberal government…

story

Liberal and NDP MPs feathering their nests before facing the public

Provincial

“Fixing health care” has been a preoccupation of provincial governments for decades.

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